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ARC Review: Dogma of the Five Kingdoms (Book 2 of A Five Kingdoms of Cordizal Series)

Dogma of the Five Kingdoms by Charles K. Jordan In Dogma of the Five Kingdoms , Book 2 of his Five Kingdoms of Cordizal series, Charles K. Jordan again plunges us straightaway into the events unfolding on the continent of Cordizal. Though the war between the Five Kingdoms and the undead Scourge continues, the focus in Book 2 is on the unfolding scheme of the mysterious figure Ta'Lin and his followers. As the book unfolds we see Ta'Lin working to resurrect powerful magik from the past. His scheme threatens to bring an end to the Five Kingdoms themselves, and may lead to a fate worse than death for their citizens. Book 2 picks up right where Book 1 left off. (My review of the first book is here .) While there is the occasional bit of backstory provided, most of the action proceeds apace. The Kingdoms of the Grang, the Nawahl, the Ramons, Arzans and Xandrans, and the ongoing war, are taken as a given. Some of the happenings in Book 1 are alluded to, but not delved into or repeate

Review: Giovanni's Room



Giovanni's Room
by James Baldwin
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

If you have not already, you owe it to yourself to spend some time in 1950's Paris, in Giovanni's room. 

James Baldwin's classic novel is a lyrical book both beautiful and frustrating. Beautiful for its language - the sentences just flow and I found it very hard to put this book down. Frustrating because it's the 1950's and so the love that the narrator David finds in Paris is hopeless, because David is a product of his time - oh so closeted and terribly selfish.

This book is full of small details while it carefully avoids getting too detailed about the heart of the story. Though it gets much closer in its depiction of love between two men (and for that matter love between a man and woman) than I would have thought possible for a book published in 1953, still it dances around it's main topic. David is a careful narrator, who does not want to admit to himself the love that he has found, and he makes a mess of things because of it. 

Yes, the times and attitudes were different then, but there is something in this story that seems timeless to me. I hated to come to the end of this one, and I am sorry that I've never picked it up before now.  Highly recommend.

Giovanni's Room links

Borrow it: Find out if your library has the ebook or audiobook available
Buy it New:  Buy this book new on AmazonBarnes & Noble or  Books-A-Million 
Buy it Used: Buy this book used on AbeBooksBetter World Books or ThriftBooks 
Support Indie Bookstores:  Buy this book directly from Bookshop.org or find an Independent Bookstore near you.